Improving business writing skills


I am not one of those writers who sits in his garret grumbling to himself about the shoddy writing skills of those around him. Far from it – I’m actively out there in the business world, grumbling to people’s faces about their writing skills.

Well, I prefer to call it “training courses” and “coaching sessions” rather than “grumbling”, but whatever we choose to call it, the fact is that over the years I have trained hundreds of people on business writing skills, and I have coached many more on a one-to-one basis.

These have tended to be people who work in public relations, and so they are better at writing than most businesspeople. But still a surprising number of them write poorly. All too often they produce e-mails, letters, briefing documents, memos, meeting notes, proposals, press releases, marketing copy and so on that is lifeless, dull and hard to read. In my courses I show them where this is happening, I explain why it’s happening and I give them practical techniques for putting it right.

It’s a part of my work that I enjoy – it’s a lot of fun to spend time working with bright people who are experts at what they do and are keen to sharpen their writing styles – but it’s also given me a really good understanding of the common mistakes that people make and the opportunities they tend to miss.

It’s remarkable how often the same ones are repeated. The English language is a vast and complex thing, and there are many thousands of errors that can be made with it, but in the world of business we all tend to make more or less the same ones.

The first mistake that many make is simply approaching writing in the wrong way. All too often businesspeople don’t see writing as relevant to them. They see  it as an activity apart from what they do or who they are.

Over the past 15 years I’ve worked with thousands of businesspeople. I’ve worked with marketers, salespeople, recruiters, public relations experts, training consultants, and some truly brilliant entrepreneurs. I’ve dealt with people who are good at what they do, but struggle to explain themselves because they can’t write. In that  time I’ve identified five very common types of non-writer. Of course everyone has  their own personal view on writing, on how relevant it is to them and their work, but these five types seem to crop up very frequently, and be responsible for a lot of the bad  writing out there. In my next post I’ll tell you what they are….

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2 Comments

Filed under Business, Writing

2 responses to “Improving business writing skills

  1. Pingback: The five types of non-writer « AB Words Blog

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